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All news

Find out the latest news about JDRF's research and fundraising events.

Displaying Wales

14
Feb

JDRF supporters raise over £10,000 scaling Aconcagua

Congratulations and a huge thank you to JDRF supporters Steve Stanaway and Brad Lincoln for conquering Aconcagua, the highest peak on earth outside of the Himalayas. They have raised over £20,000, which will be split equally between JDRF and Awyr Las, the charity for better healthcare in North Wales.

Steve lives in Cheshire and is an NHS Consultant in diabetes at Wrexham Maelor Hospital in North Wales. Aconcagua is the highest peak in both the Western and Southern Hemispheres.

Steve said: 'The summit day was enough to test us to our limits especially after all the previous days in tents, in the cold, eating the stuff we were eating, losing muscle mass and being at very high altitude.

'The weather was mischievous on the mountain and we were the first summiters in nine days due to an avalanche risk and high winds. It actually turned on us again just as we hit the summit and we had a difficult walk down to high camp to sleep. For a few days it looked like we may not even get to the top.

'Temperatures dropped to minus 10 at night and windchill outside in the day was even lower. It was the hardest thing I've ever done.'

Before setting off on this incredible challenge in January Steve said: 'Speaking as not only a doctor but also as a dad and inspired and motivated by the fortitude of many of my patients I also want my campaign to in turn inspire young people to set themselves challenges, targets and aims and strive to achieve them. Life is for living and should be embraced. The environment around us is for exploring (and respecting) and any hurdles faced in life are surmountable.'

31
Jul

Are you the type to help someone with type 1 diabetes?

How far will the people of Glasgow go to help a guy with type 1 diabetes?

JDRF has welcomed the launch of a short funny film that has been made by supporters for the charity’s benefit.

The clip features a man stealing drinks and snacks to raise his low blood glucose – while managing to avoid getting punched. This film was kindly paid for by ASCO Group, and produced and created by The Leith Agency, to persuade people to support JDRF’s Walk to Cure Diabetes events.

The Walks take place across the country in September and October.

If you want to show your support, share the video with friends and family on Facebook and Twitter (#jdrfwalktocure). And if you've been inspired, sign up now to your nearest Walk, and show that it’s not just Glaswegians who’ll help someone with type 1 diabetes.

Find your nearest Walk here.

25
Mar

Discovering type 1 diabetes in Cardiff

JDRF is calling on people in Cardiff and surrounding areas to join in our Type 1 Discovery Day on Saturday 13 April 2013. The event is an opportunity to learn more about the condition and the work of JDRF.

The JDRF team will be on hand to answer questions. There will also be a talk from Dr Garry Dolton from Cardiff University School of Medicine’s Department of Infection, Immunity and Biochemistry. Dr Dolton will be talking about his research into why certain T-cells attack insulin-producing cells and will be answering questions on the day.

Hannah Jarrett (pictured),16, a JDRF T1 Youth Ambassador from Bridgend will also be talking about living with type 1 diabetes. Hannah was diagnosed two weeks before her 11th birthday. Since being diagnosed, she has endured over 9,000 plus blood glucose tests and over 6,000 injections. She now receives insulin through a pump.

Hannah was a torchbearer at the 2012 Olympics and is dedicated to raising awareness of type 1 diabetes. She said:

'I’m really pleased that I’m able to help raise awareness of type 1 diabetes. JDRF is a great charity and I encourage my family, friends and even strangers to support such a great cause. Finding the cure for type 1 would mean the world, not only to me but my family too, and I know JDRF is dedicated to finding the cure.'

Danielle Angell, JDRF Regional Fundraiser for Wales, said:

'We are looking forward to the up and coming JDRF Type 1 Discovery Day in Cardiff. Whether you are a parent of a child who has type 1, have the condition yourself, have recently been diagnosed or have had the condition for years – the day is aimed to be fun and educational for all in the type 1 community.'

JDRF has issued a special thank you to the Medical Detection Dogs team which will also be there on the day to talk about hypo alert dogs.

This year’s event will be held at the Maldron Hotel, St Mary Street, Cardiff, CF10 1GD between 9.45am – 12.30pm. Find out more about the event and book online, or book by phone on 07531 901186 or by email at dangell@jdrf.org.uk.

18
Jul

Fun filled fundraising in Wiltshire

Young people with type 1 diabetes and their families came together on Saturday in Trowbridge, Wiltshire to learn about type 1 and take part in a fun day of fundraising for JDRF.

The day was organised by the family of Cerys Blake (pictured). Cerys has type 1 diabetes, and is a T1 Youth Ambassador for JDRF.

The event welcomed local residents and businesses with people travelling to join in the fun on the day from Swindon, Bristol, the New Forest, Devon and Wales.

The line-up included the hugely popular Buttons the Clown, glitter tattoos, face painting, outdoor play facilities, a bouncy castle, a grand raffle and an amazing band called Hot Flex!

This fun filled family event raised £1,800 for JDRF, which will help us to continue to support research into type 1 diabetes.

Thanks so much to Cerys and her mum Donna for continuing to support us. To view photos from the day, visit Cerys and Donna’s Facebook page.

If you would like to fundraise in your area, let us know so we can support you.

03
Jul

Mum plans to snap up £1000 a year for JDRF

When Jenny Potter’s 4 year old son Harry (pictured at front) was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2010, Jenny began raising money to help JDRF find the cure. Now she is taking her fundraising to the next level, setting herself a target to raise £1000 a year.

Jenny plans to use her photography skills to raise this amount. She is going to photograph children and adults with type 1, and donate sales of the images to JDRF. She is also looking into a photography exhibition and producing a book of photos of type 1 children.

Her first photo shoot took place on 27 May 2012 in Bristol (pictured). Jenny photographed children with type 1 diabetes individually, in groups and with siblings. The photos were taken for free, but are being sold online with proceeds going to JDRF via Jenny’s Just Giving page.

Jenny is currently contacting companies to see if they can donate venue space for exhibitions, helping to keep costs down. Jenny is hoping to do a photo shoot every month in different parts of the UK to get her photography project off the ground.

To view images from Jenny’s first photo shoot, visit her website at www.jennypotter.com, and click on ‘Current clients’, ‘Client viewing’ and ‘Children with type 1 diabetes.’

 If you would like to get involved with the photography project, get in touch with Jenny through her website. To help Jenny with her fundraising, visit her JustGiving page at www.justgiving.com/jennypotterphotography 

29
May

Picture this: The Millennium Stadium

If you're looking for a new picture to decorate your wall, then look no further.  A photographer based in Cardiff has decided to use his talent to raise funds for JDRF. Tony Batey, whose partner’s son has type 1 diabetes, has decided to donate £10 from each sale of his limited edition print run of the Wales Millennium Stadium to JDRF, and a further £500 if all copies of this limited print sell.

"I’m releasing a limited run of 50 prints of my photograph of the home of Welsh rugby, The Millennium Stadium, which played host to the 1999 Rugby World Cup, in aid of my chosen charity JDRF.”

The 50 prints (25 colour, and 25 black and white) each measuring at 18” x 12” come mounted and framed in your choice of ‘studio black’ or ‘natural wood’ frame, and are retailing at a special price of £75 each to include postage and packing, which is a saving of £50 compared to other images on Tony’s website.

“£10 of the profits on each print goes directly to JDRF, a total donation of £500 if all prints are sold. I’ve also promised JDRF that should all 50 prints sell, I’ll double the donation myself, bringing the total to £1,000 for this very worthy cause.”


To order your framed limited edition photograph of the Millennium Stadium, and to help Tony achieve his fundraising target of £1,000 for JDRF, visit Tony Batey’s website

04
Oct

Walk to Cure Diabetes

Walk this way for type 1 diabetes research

JDRF would like to say a big thank you to everyone who stepped out during September and October to attend one of our Walk to Cure Diabetes events.

Over 2,500 people all over the UK pulled on their walking boots and joined JDRF to Walk to Cure Diabetes, raising over £200,000 in donations and pledges.

Thank you to everyone who joined us at Oldbury Court Estate, Bristol for the five mile Walk, which raised £8,000 in donations and pledges. 

Click here to view photos from the Bristol Walk on Facebook

03
Aug

Cycling to cure diabetes

Cycling for the type 1 diabetes cure 

17-year-old Maurice Banerjee-Palmer, whose sister has type 1 diabetes, and his friend Jack are cycling 1,100 miles from Land's End to John O'Groats this August. They are taking on this incredible feat to raise money for JDRF and the Rural Libraries Fund.

Just to make it even more of a challenge, they will be cycling unsupported and camping along the way. They will be covering an impressive average of over 80 miles a day.

The boys are no strangers to long-distance cycling, having completed a 583-mile cycle-camping tour from Bristol to the Peak District, Liverpool and back again last year.

Follow their progress on this amazing challenge at www.rtlejog.blogspot.com/ 

To sponsor them, visit their Just Giving page at www.justgiving.com/rtlejog

Good luck!

Meanwhile, Maurice's 15 year old sister Josna, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes aged three, is also taking part in the Bristol Walk to Cure Diabetes taking place on 4 September at Oldbury Court Estate.

Click here for more information about the Walk or to register to join Josna.

24
May

Discovering hope at Puxton Park

Debbie Young is a JDRF supporter and mother to Laura, an eight year old girl with type 1 diabetes. They both attended the JDRF Type 1 Discovery Day at Puxton Park on Saturday 7 May 2011 and Debbie has written an account of the day... 

Not being much of a scientist, when I went along to this year’s JDRF Discovery Day at Puxton Park I was prepared for the scientific presentations to go over my head. So I was mightily impressed when I realised that thanks to Dr Garry Dolton I suddenly understood the concept of T-cells and their role in the development of type 1 diabetes.

Dr Dolton is part of the T-cell Modulation Group (www.tcells.org) at Cardiff University School of Medicine’s Department of Infection, Immunity and Biochemistry. His team is carrying out valuable research into why certain T-cells attack insulin-producing cells. Their findings could be critical on the path to preventing and reversing type 1 diabetes. Dr Dolton’s description of T-cells ‘touring the body on surveillance seeking infections and bacteria to kill,’ (mistakenly striking pancreatic beta cells en route) brought James Bond to mind. Never has the search for the cure sounded so exciting! The futuristic laser technology used to identify and track them would certainly seem at home in a 007 film. JDRF is the sole source of funding for this ground-breaking project, and Dr Dolton’s eloquent and accessible explanation was a persuasive argument to support JDRF.

But the Discovery Day was not just about the search for the cure. It also advised how best to manage diabetes until the cure is found. Sabrina Dawe, a volunteer from www.input.me.uk, gave a crystal clear explanation of the value of insulin pumps as an alternative to injection therapy. Her own son has used a pump since diagnosis at 11 months, but her explanation was measured and rational, rather than evangelical – this was no sales pitch. Instead it simply equipped the audience to make their own decisions about whether a pump would be right for them.

The Discovery Day balanced the science of type 1 diabetes and its management with coping strategies for the emotional burden that diabetes places on the individual and their family. Annabel Astle, whose daughter Mimi was diagnosed with type 1 when a baby, gave a moving but ultimately positive account of how diabetes has affected her whole family. Annabel’s husband Jeff then reported on his means of coping by taking a practical approach to fundraising. Along with Sabrina Dawe and 11 other members of ‘Team Pingu’, he ran this year’s London Marathon.

By the end of the morning the audience was left in no doubt as to the value of supporting JDRF, whatever their preferred method of fundraising. We then spent the afternoon enjoying the wonderful family facilities of Puxton Park (free admission was kindly granted to families attending the Discovery Day). The highlight was the amazing owl encounter – catch it next time if you missed it and you will remember it for the rest of your life! I was left buoyed up by the whole day and more resolved than ever to complete my mission the following weekend of running the Bristol 10k for Team Pingu. (Not sure whether I’ll ever make marathon status!)

But that night I was brought back to earth when my daughter had a severe hypo at 3am. Frightening in its intensity, it was a sobering reminder that seeking the cure for type 1 diabetes is a serious, urgent business.

I am thankful to JDRF for all that they do. Their search for the cure continues behind closed doors as we go about our daily lives managing our children’s condition. JDRF then open the doors to us on these occasions and gives us hope for their future. 

For further information on JDRF's Type 1 Discovery Days and other similar events, please visit http://www.jdrf.org.uk/research