Cookies on the JDRF website

Our website uses cookies to make your experience as great as possible. By continuing to use the website, we will assume that you agree to the use of cookies on the website. However, if you would like to change your cookie settings, please visit the website of The Information Commissioner's Office to find out how to control or delete cookies on your browser.

All news

Find out the latest news about JDRF's research and fundraising events.

Displaying October 2011

27
Oct

1Quest weekend

JDRF holds its first 1Quest weekend

On Saturday 22 October, eight children with type 1 diabetes arrived at Avon Tyrrell in the New Forest to begin their 1Quest weekend. Travelling from as far as Leeds, the children arrived, eager to begin their weekend full of fun and challenges.

Over the weekend, the children were able to take part in adrenalin filled activities, such as zip wire and high ropes. The activities tested their team building skills and nerve. At the end of the raft building challenge, all the children even jumped into the freezing cold lake!

Throughout their stay at Avon Tyrrell the children were well cared for by PDSN Jennifer Luscombe from the University College of London. JDRF staff and Jennifer ensured the children were regularly tested and, if necessary, treated during the weekend.

Raising money for type 1 diabetes research and developing life skills

In order to join the 1Quest weekend, participants had to raise a minimum of £300. They did this by asking for donations from friends and family, organising bake sales, and even doing a sponsored 10 mile walk. Their fundraising will help JDRF to continue supporting research into type 1 diabetes, but has also provided participants with skills they can use later on in life.

JDRF would like to thank the Monument Trust for their support of 1Quest and providing funding for the event. We would also like to thank all the children who attended the 1Quest weekend and we hope they had as much fun as we did.

If you would like to register you interest for the next 1Quest weekend, please email Hannah Roberts, hroberts@jdrf.org.uk

27
Oct

Behind the headlines: Diabetes rises by 50% in five years fuelled by soaring levels of obesity

This morning The Daily Mail and The Guardian reported that the number of people being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has increased by fifty percent in the last five years due to rising levels of obesity in the UK.

Whilst reporting on the growing number of adults being diagnosed with type 2, the article said that more children than ever are being diagnosed with the condition, whereas in the past it was usually only seen in adults. Figures suggest up to 1,400 children now have type 2 diabetes. These figures are cause for serious concern, but it should also be noted that incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising by 4% year on year, and faster in children under the age of five. In fact, there are over 26,000 children in the UK currently living with type 1 diabetes. With such a high number of young people being diagnosed with the condition, we feel its important to recognise the impact type 1 is having on the young population of Britain.

Although there is a government and media focus on the obesity agenda, JDRF is committed to keeping attention on type 1 diabetes, presenting the facts about the autoimmune condition, highlighting that it isn’t caused by lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise as type 2 diabetes can sometimes be.

You may have heard about the Type 1 Parliament event we are planning for April 2012. JDRF is giving 60 adults and children with type 1 the chance to have their say about the issues and challenges they face to MPs and government officials at Westminster. If you’re passionate about making a difference and want to raise awareness of the condition, why not get involved by applying to attend. The competition closes at midnight on Monday 31 October, so be sure to get your entry in before then. You can apply here 

26
Oct

Insulin pumps in Scotland

Access to insulin pumps improves in Scotland

JDRF is delighted that the government in Scotland has recognised the need for the greater uptake of insulin pumps. We feel it’s vital that people with type 1 diabetes have access to the medicines and equipment that help them to stay healthy and manage their condition effectively whilst we search for the cure.

Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon said, ‘The pumps can mean freedom from having multiple injections a day, and, for the youngest diabetics, can go some way to giving them back a normal childhood. I want to see insulin pumps made available to 25 per cent of children and teens with type 1 diabetes by 2013. We will also increase the number of pumps available to all Scots to over 2,000 - almost tripling the current amount over the next three years. 

‘Diabetes is a growing problem for NHS Scotland. It’s now thought that around 10 per cent per cent of overall hospital expenditure relates to the treatment of diabetes and its complications.

‘The consequences of not dealing effectively with diabetes can cause long term health problems and we need to make sure that the youngest people with type 1 diabetes get the treatment that’s right for them as early as possible.’

These plans were announced as part of the Diabetes Action Plan, which was published in August of this year. You can read the full report here.

JDRF works hard to raise awareness of the issues people with type 1 diabetes face and to ensure they have access to the best treatments and equipment to manage their condition. You can read about the campaigning work we do in more detail here.

26
Oct

Ford get behind the wheel to support JDRF

Founder of Ford Motor Company, Henry Ford once said ‘Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success.’ Ford has supported JDRF globally for a number of years and has supported JDRF’s flagship annual fundraiser, The Walk to Cure Diabetes in both the UK and abroad. Earlier this year, Ford of Britain announced that to mark their centennial year, they aim to raise £100,000 for the charity through dealership activity in 2011.

Ford customers are being invited to donate £1 to JDRF when they visit any of Ford’s large network of dealerships across the UK. To raise awareness of type 1 diabetes and the importance of funding research into type 1 diabetes, Ford has launched a poster marketing campaign featuring a series of young people who are living with the condition.

Since its launch, we are delighted that the campaign has already attracted donations of around £26,000 from dealers who were inspired by the information they received demonstrating the impact that type 1 diabetes can have on a family’s life and JDRF’s mission to find the cure.

Hartwell, a Ford Dealership in Abingdon was among the first to donate to the charity with a shared donation of £3000 towards funding research into type 1 diabetes. Since then, there have been bake sales at Sandcliffe in the Midlands, sky dives by staff at Dagenham Motors and Polar Ford, bike riding and zip sliding at the Heartlands Ford branch and Lindsay Ford in Northern Ireland is taking to the roads in a Charity Cycle to raise money for JDRF. A team of thirteen staff will be cycling around the company’s ten locations and a total of 120 miles will be covered by the Lindsay Ford cyclists.

Greyhound Ford in East Lancashire are marking their fiftieth year in business with a two week celebration and a showroom event. For every car sold they are kindly donating £50 to JDRF. A huge thank you to Ford staff and customers for kicking things off so positively as we head towards the £100,000 total!

If you want to support Ford’s campaign and encourage your local Ford dealership to take part, you can find out more about the partnership here. 

26
Oct

Determined fundraisers

The determination of JDRF supporters

'Team yeah' (otherwise known as the Tanner family) had entered themselves for the grueling Sussex Obstacle Dash and spent the whole summer fundraising for JDRF and training for the event. 

Unfortunately, the organisers of the event have cancelled it. But there was no way 'Team Yeah' was going to let JDRF, their sponsors, or daughter Isabel down. Instead, they have devised their own challenging route through Hastings Country Park, including a particularly challenging stretch that they affectionately call ‘Cardiac Pass’ (basically, when you’ve done it you need a re-sus trolley!). Their challenge now is to run, jog, walk or crawl 5k around the park – including the notorious Cardiac Pass – for what they believe will be a much greater challenge than the original Sussex Obstacle Dash.

The great news is that all their sponsors are still happy to support them – so long as they are covered in mud at the end – helping JDRF to continue funding vital type 1 diabetes research!

If you would like to support 'Team Yeah' in their challenge visit http://www.justgiving.com/Allison-Tanner

24
Oct

Access to insulin pumps improves in Scotland

Last Friday, Scottish government announced that a quarter of young people with type 1 diabetes in the country will have access to insulin pumps by 2013. It was also confirmed that over the next three years, the number of insulin pumps available to people of all ages with type 1 diabetes will almost triple to more than 2,000.

JDRF is delighted that the government in Scotland have recognised the need for greater uptake of insulin pumps. We feel its vital that people with type 1 diabetes have access to the medicines and equipment that help them to stay healthy and manage their condition effectively whilst we search for the cure.

Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon said, “The pumps can mean freedom from having multiple injections a day, and, for the youngest diabetics, can go some way to giving them back a normal childhood. I want to see insulin pumps made available to 25 per cent of children and teens with type 1 diabetes by 2013. We will also increase the number of pumps available to all Scots to over 2,000 - almost tripling the current amount over the next three years. 

"Diabetes is a growing problem for NHS Scotland. It’s now thought that around 10 per cent per cent of overall hospital expenditure relates to the treatment of diabetes and its complications."

“The consequences of not dealing effectively with diabetes can cause long term health problems and we need to make sure that the youngest people with type 1 diabetes get the treatment that’s right for them as early as possible.”

These plans were announced as part of the Diabetes Action Plan which was published in August of this year. You can read the full report here

JDRF works hard to raise awareness of the issues people with type 1 diabetes face and to ensure they have access to the best treatments and equipment to manage their condition. You can read about the campaigning work we do in more detail here

20
Oct

Type 1 fundraiser nominated for award

Type 1 diabetes fundraiser nominated for Champion Award

Well done to Neil McDonald for his nomination in this year's Evening Express Aberdeen's Champion Awards. We are delighted that the tremendous effort he has put into his ‘Climb for a Cure’ campaign has been recognised in the charity section. So far the campaign has raised £106,000 in aid of JDRF and the type 1 diabetes research we fund. Good luck Neil!

Please support Neil and vote for him by calling 0901 736 2734 and voting for 017 or texting EE Champion 017 to 83070. See local press for text charges. Lines close midnight on Sunday 23rd October.

20
Oct

RBS bake sale

Bake sale at RBS raises funds for type 1 diabetes research

The Credit Review team from the Royal Bank of Scotland have recently raised an impressive £460 for JDRF. They achieved this by holding a very tasty bake sale that had rice crispy, corn flake, and butterfly cakes on the menu. They also held a raffle and carried out a sponsored silence, with one member of the team managing to stay silent for an amazing eight hours.

JDRF would like to thank the Credit Review team for their support of JDRF and the type 1 diabetes research we fund. Our only disappointment is that we missed out on their delicious bake sale!

19
Oct

Professionals agree: continuous glucose monitoring can help in managing type 1 diabetes

A new clinical guideline spells out that continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can be a beneficial tool to help maintain target blood glucose levels, and limit the risk of hypoglycaemia.

The guideline was developed by the Endocrine Society, an international organisation for researchers and clinicians who work on hormone disorders like type 1 diabetes. The complete guideline is published in the current issue of Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

A team of experts from the society reviewed all of the evidence around CGM use published to date in order to come up with the new guidelines. They found that there was high-quality evidence to recommend the use of real-time CGM in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes who are at least eight years old, and in adults with type 1 diabetes as well. But the guideline does stress that CGMs are only useful if the person with type 1 is prepared to use it on a daily basis.

The chair of the task force that drew up the guideline, Dr David Klonoff of Mills-Peninsula Health Services in San Mateo, California, said “There are some caveats to consider before accepting continuous monitoring of glucose as a routine measure to improve glycaemic control in diabetes. There are still concerns about the high costs of CGM and the accuracy of the various systems available. However, the new CPG shows that CGM can be a beneficial tool to help maintain target levels of glycaemia and limit the risk of hypoglycaemia.”

Rachel Connor Head of Research Communication at JDRF UK said “This new clinical guideline may help to convince some clinicians, who may still feel uncertain about the accuracy and usefulness of CGM, that this technology has a place in the management of type 1 diabetes.”

The Endocrine Society’s patient education affiliate, The Hormone Society has produced a really helpfulpatient guide to CGM, which includes information about the new recommendations.

13
Oct

Meeting of minds: researchers agree key steps for preventing type 1

What will it take to make tangible progress on the goal of preventing type 1 diabetes before symptoms emerge? This is the question posed at a workshop in October 2010, organised by JDRF, the UK Science and Innovation Network, and the Wellcome Trust.

Over two days, European experts of type 1 diabetes research debated this topic. Drawing on clinical and laboratory expertise and an encyclopaedic knowledge of type 1 diabetes research, the participants built up a clear picture of where we are now in the journey toward being able to prevent type 1.

The current issue of the scientific journal Diabetic Medicine carries an expert position statement (PDF download) setting out the three key recommendations to come out of this workshop.

First is that diabetes registries and natural history studies (such as the one being carried out by the TrialNet team in Bristol) are vital. The information they gather about the very earliest events in the process of developing type 1 diabetes are vital to researchers looking to develop treatments that can modify these processes.

Second is that we need to gain a much deeper understanding of the roles played by our genes and our environment in the development of type 1. Studies like TEDDY will be key to progress in this area.

Third, our new understanding that there may be different ‘varieties’ of type 1 diabetes must be applied when designing future studies. By different ‘varieties’ we mean that at the level of genes and cells, slightly different changes may occur between one person with type 1 and another, even though the result is the same. Therefore, ways to prevent the condition from developing may need to be different for these different varieties. So trials in the future may need to build in further molecular testing to give scientists this extra level of information.

Read more about the TrialNet and TEDDY studies and JDRF’s approach to prevention research.

12
Oct

Poets and photographers unite for unique charity project

41 UK based poets and photographers have worked together to create a unique charity calendar to raise money for JDRF. Poet Victoria Bennett came up with the idea after her son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The calendar features nude male poets posing for each month of the year. Each nude image has been shot by a different female photographer. As inspiration for the shoot, the poet and photographer duo were given an individual poem on the theme of ‘the male muse’ which has been donated by a collection of female poets. The poems will feature alongside each of the images in the final calendar. 

The photography was shot in places of literary inspiration across Cumbria, as well as other locations across the UK. Greta Hall, the former home to Southey and Coleridge, in the heart of the Lake District, was one of the main locations.

Commenting on the project, Victoria Bennett said “After my two-year-old son was diagnosed with type one diabetes I was looking for a way that I could help raise money for much needed research into the disease. Those who are good at climbing scale mountains, those good at running enter a marathon. So this was about using my skills and contacts in the arts world to raise money and awareness. It also gave me the chance to explore a theme which interests me, that of the focus on the male muse, as opposed to the female muse. I hope the project will attract the attention of anybody interested in photography and poetry, as well as people who simply want to support the cause."

The Naked Muse 2012 Calendar is created and published by Wild Women Press to raise funds to support JDRF’s research. The calendar will be available to pre-order from Thursday 6 October 2011, at a special price of £12.99 incl shipping (normal price £14.99). You can order a calendar by visiting their website.

Also, people can subscribe to a newsletter through the website. They will then receive a weekly PDF newsletter, with articles, extra images, words and insights behind the scenes of the project, up until the launch.

You can also subscribe to JDRF's e-newsletter . or sign up to receive JDRF's Discovery Magazine free for a year.

12
Oct

Poets and photographers

Poets and photographers unite for unique charity project

41 UK based poets and photographers have worked together to create a unique charity calendar to raise money for JDRF. Poet, Victoria Bennett,  came up with the idea after her son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The calendar features nude male poets posing for each month of the year.  Each image has been shot by a different female photographer. As inspiration for the shoot, the poet and photographer duos were given individual poems, which were donated by a collection of female poets, on the theme of ‘the male muse’. The poems will feature alongside each of the images in the final calendar.

The photography was shot in places of literary inspiration across Cumbria, as well as other locations across the UK. Greta Hall, the former home to Southey and Coleridge, in the heart of the Lake District, was one of the main locations.

Commenting on the project, Victoria Bennett said: ‘After my two-year-old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was looking for a way that I could help raise money for much needed research into the disease. Those who are good at climbing scale mountains; those good at running enter a marathon. So this was about using my skills and contacts in the arts world to raise money and awareness. It also gave me the chance to explore a theme which interests me: that of the focus on the male muse, as opposed to the female muse.  I hope the project will attract the attention of anybody interested in photography and poetry, as well as people who simply want to support the cause.’

The Naked Muse 2012 Calendar is created and published by Wild Women Press to raise funds to support JDRF’s type 1 diabetes research. The calendar will be available to pre-order from Thursday 6 October 2011, at a special price of £12.99 including shipping (normal price £14.99). To order a calendar visit www.wildwomenpress.com

Also, people can subscribe to a newsletter through the website. They will then receive a weekly PDF newsletter, with articles, extra images, words, and insights behind the scenes of the project up until the launch.

Credits: Dreadlock Alien (aka Richard Grant)/Photo by Tamara Peel/Location Kidderminster.

06
Oct

Behind the headlines: Stem cell research

News headlines today have highlighted progress in developing a new way to create human stem cells. We believe it is important to pursue all research approaches that could potentially lead to a cure for type 1 diabetes and support the exploration of all avenues of stem cell research.

Scott Noggle of the New York Stem Cell Foundation reported the research in leading biology journal Nature. The technique described takes us a step closer towards a process for creating stem cells called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

The stem cells were created by inserting an adult cell into a human egg cell, which was then encouraged to divide and grow. The researchers were then able to extract the stem cells from the ball of cells that developed. No sperm was used in the process, and the egg was never placed in a uterus, avoiding ethical issues often associated with embryonic stem cells.

Stem cells are exciting because they could potentially be directed to develop into specific cell types, such as beta cells, which could then be used as a treatment. Stem cells derived through SCNT would be unique because they are genetically matched to the adult cell donor, meaning they might be transplanted into the donor without the need to suppress the immune system. In someone with type 1 diabetes, the original autoimmune attack against the bodies insulin-producing cells would still need to be controlled, but it would be a significant advantage to have a patient-matched source of cells that would avoid immune rejection.

However, the technique is yet to be perfected. The full procedure requires the removal of the egg cell’s nucleus, as the stem cells created currently have two sets of chromosomes and are not viable for use as a therapy. This step has presented a significant challenge to researchers, meaning there may still be many years of work ahead before any stem cell therapies are developed.

06
Oct

White coat effect lowers HbA1c

It may not be a huge surprise, but families who frequently monitor their child’s blood glucose have been found to increase the number of blood glucose measurements just before a child’s visit to the clinic.

In a study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team from Florida State University College of Medicine studied data from the glucose meters of 72 children aged 2 – 11 years old.

The so-called ‘white coat effect’, where impending clinic visits boost the frequency of glucose monitoring, was observed among children with the lowest HbA1c levels. In contrast, the monitoring of children with higher HbA1c levels showed a flat or slightly declining pattern of glucose monitoring between clinic visits.

Families who increased their monitoring before the clinic visit may have benefited from the additional information they were able to provide their child’s doctor.

Future studies will be needed to assess the white coat effect in adolescents and young adults.

Read the full article here (subscription required).

05
Oct

Getting teenagers involved in research

Here at JDRF we receive lots of enquiries from people interested in taking part in clinical trials. This is great news. All the valuable fundraising by our supporters would not be nearly as useful if there were not lots of willing volunteers to test new treatments, drugs and devices. 

We also know that trials of new treatments for teenagers are particularly important as it can be a really difficult time to maintain good glucose control,  due to changing hormones and lifestyles. However, teenagers can be a tricky group to pin down for clinical trials, which is where you may be able to help.

If you know someone between 10 and 16 years old with type 1 who might be interested in taking part in a trial, read on.

The Adolescent type 1 Diabetes cardio-renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT) is a clinical trial being led by Professor David Dunger, who is a Professor of Paediatrics at Addenbrooke’s Hospital at the University of Cambridge. The aim of the work is to prevent the progression of cardiovascular and renal complications in high-risk adolescents. 

Blood pressure and fat lowering drugs are frequently used in adults with Type 1 diabetes to reduce risk for future complications. They may also be of value during adolescence when HbAIc  levels may be less well controlled. We plan to find out whether these drugs have a role in the treatment of adolescents through a large trial involving nearly a thousand young people. 

These teenagers will take part in the project which will take place in the UK, Australia and Canada.  It will take five years to complete and is currently the only study of its kind. The trial is in its third year but more volunteers are still needed.

In an initial screening stage, volunteers will be asked to provide urine samples. Depending on the levels of protein these samples contain, they may then be invited to take part in the main study testing the effects of blood pressure and cholesterol lowering drugs. To make it even easier to take part, the young people involved in the trial will have study visits arranged to coincide with their routine clinic visits so far as possible, and may even have their routine diabetes care provided through a special AdDIT clinic, so that they do not have the inconvenience of two clinic visits. Others will be invited to take part in a comparison study which will not involve taking any study drugs but in which they will be closely followed up.

Screening is taking place in these regions of the UK:

Aylesbury and High Wycombe lisatate@nhs.net
Birmingham rebecca.morgan@bch.nhs.uk
Birmingham (Heartlands) Indy.Birak@bch.nhs.uk
Bristol theresa.portch@bristol.ac.uk
Bolton Jessica.Nichols@cmft.nhs.uk
Cambridge ja453@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Ipswich jon.hassler-hurst@ipswichhospital.nhs.uk
Manchester Elizabeth.Jacklin@cmft.nhs.uk
sue.greenhalgh@salford.nhs.uk
Newcastle and 
Middlesborough
alison.murray@stees.nhs.uk
joanne.lawson5@nuth.nhs.uk
Northampton lucy.dudgeon@ngh.nhs.uk
Norwich Joe.ellis-gage@nnuh.nhs.uk
Oxford susan.rous@orh.nhs.uk
Reading juliesutton@nhs.net
Stockport

sara.bennett@stockport.nhs.uk

Wigan Jamie.Dolan@wwuh.nhs.uk
West Suffolk jennie.sharp@wsh.nhs.uk


Or you can also email the coordinating centre: ukgrid@paed.cam.ac.uk

There is a list of other type 1 diabetes clinical trials on our website with contact details so you can get in touch directly if you are interested. There are also a number of diabetes clinical research organisationsand databases listed on our website who can help you find suitable trials. 

05
Oct

Great British team shine again at Medtronic Junior Cup

On the 26 to 28 August the fifth edition of the Medtronic Junior Cup took place at the Stade du Bout du Monde in Geneva, Switzerland. 250 children with type 1 took part in the tournament, representing 15 countries for a weekend of football fun. Ten children aged between 10 and14 were on the Junior Team for Great Britain. 

Day one of the tournament saw GB team easily defeat the Italians in their first game. After this their confidence soared and there was no stopping them. They went on to win every one of their games on day one placing them a strong first on the leaderboard. 

The second day of the tournament continued in much the same vein with a high standard of playing exhibited by the GB team. The competition most definitely got tougher for the young footballers but goals scored throughout the tournament saw team GB triumphantly through to the final with The Netherlands. After an early goal by the giant Netherlands team followed in quick succession by several more, the final whistle blew and the team of young footballers had to settle for runners up position.

However disappointment didn’t last too long and once they had collected their players medals and a shiny trophy at the award ceremony, team GB flew home to the UK tired but extremely excited and full of tales of an amazing weekend which according to them all and their parents they will always remember.

04
Oct

ADDRESS-2 study appeals to people newly diagnosed with type 1

ADDRESS-2, a new project launched today is inviting people who are newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and their siblings to get involved with research studies in order to help researchers to understand the way the condition works.

Jointly funded by JDRF and Diabetes UK and supported by the NIHR Diabetes Research Network, ADDRESS-2 is a project to establish a group of people aged 5-60 who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within the previous 26 weeks who would be happy to participate in research.

Participants will be interviewed to collect demographics, information about their health and the health of their family. They will be asked to give a blood sample if they wish, for auto-antibody analysis, blood sample storage, DNA extraction and storage and be willing to be contacted by their local project team about future type 1 diabetes research studies.

The project will then create a national database of people who can be approached about taking part in type 1 diabetes trials or other clinical research studies. Researchers will also be able to access the information, blood samples and DNA repository which is important for their studies.

How can I get involved?
People newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes will be approached in their hospital diabetes clinic, given information about the project, and asked to participate. Contact with siblings will be made via liaison with the newly diagnosed participants, or where appropriate, their parents. Diabetologists and paediatricians have agreed to help find participants in 75 hospital diabetes clinics across England and Wales. If you are interested in finding out more about how to get involved you can visit www.address2.org

04
Oct

Walk to Cure Diabetes

Walk this way for type 1 diabetes research

JDRF would like to say a big thank you to everyone who stepped out during September and October to attend one of our Walk to Cure Diabetes events.

Over 2,500 people all over the UK pulled on their walking boots and joined JDRF to Walk to Cure Diabetes, raising over £200,000 in donations and pledges.

Thank you to everyone who joined us at Oldbury Court Estate, Bristol for the five mile Walk, which raised £8,000 in donations and pledges. 

Click here to view photos from the Bristol Walk on Facebook

04
Oct

Walk to Cure Diabetes

Walk this way for the type 1 diabetes cure

JDRF would like to say a big thank you to everyone who put on their walking shoes during September and October to attend one of our Walk to Cure Diabetes events.

More than 2,500 people from all over the UK joined JDRF to Walk to Cure Diabetes, raising over £200,000 in donations and pledges.

Thank you to everyone who joined us in Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham on 17 September and in Sherwood Pines on 2 October for the volunteer-organised East Midlands Walk. 

Click here to view photos from the Birmingham and Sherwood Pines Walks on Facebook

03
Oct

New type 1 diabetes genes unravelled

Researchers from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia have identified a new group of genetic differences that may increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

The team carried out the study by comparing samples from 10,000 people with type 1 diabetes with 17,000 people without type 1. The databases contained details of areas of the genome where there are differences in the DNA code of just one letter. These act as signposts for scientists, alerting them to regions of a gene associated with type 1 diabetes. 

Published online in the journal Public Library of Science Genetics, the research described three new places where the genes of people with type 1 were different. A particularly important variation is on the gene called LM07 that is associated with pancreas islet cells.

This latest discovery adds to the 50 genetic regions that have previously been linked to type 1 diabetes by researchers such as the JDRF-funded Professor John Todd at the University of Cambridge.

Dr Eleanor Kennedy said: “This research gives us a better understanding of the genetics of type 1 diabetes. Looking forward, it will be interesting to see what role these small genetic alterations play in the development of the condition.”