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All news

Find out the latest news about JDRF's research and fundraising events.

Displaying July 2011

29
Jul

Charities work together to appeal NICE’s decision and save sight

Together with four other UK charities, JDRF has today launched an appeal against a NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) decision not to recommend the drug Lucentis for treatment of Diabetic Macular Oedema (DMO) on the NHS. 

Current research indicates that ranibizumab (marketed as Lucentis) is highly effective in treating DMO and, significantly, that it meets an unmet need for patients who do not respond well to the current standard laser treatment.

JDRF supported the early development of Lucentis through our Innovative Grant programme. Further collaboration with Genentech, a biotech company based in San Francisco, and Johns Hopkins Medical School, enabled clinical research to help reveal the full therapeutic benefit of the drug for people with type 1 diabetes.

JDRF is working together with Diabetes UK, Macular Disease Society and the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) to put together an appeal to encourage NICE, the Department of Health and the drug manufacturer to ensure the drug is available to patients with Diabetic Macular Oedema on the NHS.

The charities are also urging the drug manufacturer, the Department of Health and NICE to reconsider the option of a Patient Access Scheme so that a maximum number of patients can benefit from this new sight saving treatment.

The drug offers a real step change from the currently available laser treatment. It prevents further sight loss and in many cases even improves vision. We understand that NICE must consider the cost effectiveness of any new drug. But the impact of blindness is such that NICE, the Department of Health and the drug manufacturer must work together to find a solution that prevents people losing their sight when a licensed and effective treatment is available.

Join in with the campaign
Why not join us in making a noise about NICE’s decision and how it will impact you? We need help from all people affected by type 1 diabetes and Diabetic Macular Odeoma to spread the word about out appeal in a bid to get NICE to reconsider their decision.

You can show your support by following the conversations on Twitter @JDRFUK today and tweeting your comments and using the hashtag #lucentis.

If you don’t use Twitter, become our friend by searching for JDRF UK on Facebook and join the conversation that way.

22
Jul

Swimmers brave the elements crossing the channel for JDRF

Six swimmers waded into the water along the Dover coastline yesterday, ready to start a relay swim across the English Channel to France.

The Channel Swim which was sponsored by Animas®, began near Shakespeare's Cliff/ Samphire Hoe (between Folkestone and Dover), and ended near Cap Gris Nez, between Boulogne and Calais. The total swimming time can be from 12 to 17 hours depending on the current, but the team completed the race in a speedy and very impressive 13 hours and 26 minutes. The temperature of the sea was approximately 15-18 degrees celcius, and swimmers also had to endure water hazards, such as seaweed, and jellyfish. 

Three of the swimmers participating in the Channel Swim Relay have type 1 diabetes. So as well as overcoming the physical exertion of the challenge and cold water temperatures, they also had to fight to keep their blood glucose levels under control during a long, arduous swim. Each has lived with the condition for more than 10 years, and used an Animas waterproof* insulin pump to help them control their blood glucose during the swim.

We would like to say a big thank you to the six swimmers for braving the elements and to Animas® for organising the event. To date, the relay team has already raised more than £2,100 for JDRF.

To sponsor the team, visit http://www.justgiving.com/animas-swimmers or you can find out about how they got on by searching for the 'Animas® Channel Swim' group page on Facebook.

21
Jul

JDRF T1 Youth Ambassador wins Nottinghamshire Young People of the Year awards

We are delighted that one of our T1 Youth Ambassadors, George Dove, has been chosen as Junior Winner of the Nottinghamshire Police & Fire Young People of the Year award for his work raising awareness of type 1 diabetes and fundraising for JDRF.

George found out the good news at the awards ceremony last Thursday. The winner gets £125 for their cause and George has kindly chosen to donate this to JDRF.

13 year old George Dove is passionate about raising awareness of type 1. Even at his young age, he campaigns for the Government to invest more money into medical research and spreads the word about improving access to insulin pumps. He has done various radio interviews, delivered speeches about what its like to live with the condition to large audiences, organised his very own Walk to Cure Diabetes locally and to date has raised more than £30,000 for JDRF.

15
Jul

NICE decide Lucentis is not an effective use of NHS resources

A new treatment for visual impairment caused by diabetic macular oedema (DMO) has this week been added to the list of medicines that are not considered an ‘effective use of NHS resources’. NICE has concluded that it does not recommend Lucentis® (ranibizumab) for use within the NHS in England and Wales for the treatment of visual impairment due to Diabetic Macular Oedema (DMO).

JDRF believes it is vital that patients with diabetic macular oedema receive safe and effective treatments for their condition. This is why we supported the early development of Lucentis through our Innovative Grant programme. Further collaboration with Genentech, a biotech company based in San Francisco, and Johns Hopkins Medical School, enabled clinical research to help reveal the full therapeutic benefit of the drug for people with type 1 diabetes.

DMO is caused by swelling in the centre of the retina – the light-sensitive area at the back of the eye that provides detailed vision. The swelling results from damage to small blood vessels caused by years of elevated blood sugar levels, which –even with the best possible treatment – are hard to avoid entirely when living with type 1 diabetes.

The standard treatment for DMO has been the same for the last 25 years – laser treatment to destroy areas of abnormal blood vessel growth at the back of the eye. However this treatment does not improve vision, it only slows the progression of the condition.

Therefore the decision by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to not recommend the drug ranibizumab (marketed as Lucentis) for use within the NHS to treat DMO is disappointing. Current research indicates that ranibizumab is highly effective in treating DMO and, significantly, that it meets an unmet need for patients who do not respond well to the current standard laser treatment.

Lucentis has been approved in the USA for the treatment of DMO, and is also approved in Europe for treating another eye condition, wet age-related macular degeneration. The fact that ranibizumab has not been NICE approved for the treatment of visual impairment caused by diabetic macular oedema means that clinicians may be forced to turn to unlicensed and therefore untested alternatives, putting patients’ sight at risk. 

If left untreated, diabetic macular oedema can lead to vision loss. The condition affects approximately 28% of people who have had diabetes for at least 20 years. The standard treatment of this condition has been the same for the last 25 years – laser treatment to destroy areas of abnormal blood vessel growth at the back of the eye. However, despite reducing the progression of the condition, this treatment does not improve vision.

JDRF campaigns to raise awareness of type 1 diabetes, informing key decision makers about the issues people living with the condition face. If you haven't already, get involved with JDRF's 1 Campaign. Together we can lobby the Government to invest more money in medical research and to improve access to treatments. 

15
Jul

Bayer Around U

Around U is a programme launched by Bayer Diabetes Care in 2008 to provide online and offline support for young people living with diabetes.

The football and dance days support the Around U programme by bringing together up to 300 young people with diabetes and presenting them with useful advice and information in a fun, face-to-face environment.

The programme is supported by diabetes.co.uk, as well as JDRF, who ensure that diabetes professionals are on hand to talk to parents about the latest research in this area.

This year Around U events are being held at Glasgow Celtic FC’s training grounds, City Limits Dancentre in Sheffield, Pineapple Studios in London as well as the London Soccerdome, during the summer holiday. A few places are still available at Pineapple Studios, London on 30 August and at London's Soccerdome on 31 August - for more details and to book your place, please call Andrea Postles, PR & Media Relations Manager at Bayer Plc on 01635 563031.

12
Jul

Time for more T regulatory cells

A JDRF-funded clinical trial is recruiting volunteers in the US to test the safety and feasibility of using regulatory T cells as a therapy for type 1 diabetes.

T cells are an important part of your immune system and there are a number of different types. Killer T cells play a vital role in the autoimmune attack that causes type 1 diabetes. Normally, these cells are kept in check by regulatory T cells, but in someone with type 1 diabetes these two types of T cell are out of balance.

This Phase I trial, led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), aims to redress the balance by increasing the numbers of regulatory T cells. To do this, the researchers will first take blood samples from each volunteer. They will then isolate their T cells before multiplying them 1000-fold in the laboratory before infusing them back into the volunteer’s body.

If successful, this could pave the way for a Phase II trial testing whether the addition of regulatory T cells is able to stabilise the destruction of insulin producing beta cells.

Professor Stephen Gitelman, one of the lead investigators of the study at UCSF said: "For all these years, we have been looking outside of the patient to fight the autoimmune response that leads to type 1 diabetes, but now the answer may lie within the patients themselves."

11
Jul

Ford aims to raise £100,000 for JDRF to mark 100 years of Ford of Britain

Ford Motor Company Ltd is supporting JDRF in its centennial year and will be working with us to help boost fundraising activities and raise more money for much needed research into type 1 diabetes.

Ford has worked with JDRF internationally for a number of years and has supported our flagship annual fundraising event, The Walk to Cure Diabetes through the Ford Global Walk Team.

To mark Ford of Britain's centennial year, staff in dealerships are aiming high by planning to raise a symbolic £100,000 for JDRF by the end of the year.

Employees who work in Ford dealerships across the country will be getting their thinking caps on to come up with great fundraising ideas to raise money in their local showrooms. Ford customers will also be invited to support the activity by donating £1 towards JDRF when they visit any one of Ford’s dealerships across the UK.

To raise awareness of type 1 diabetes and the importance of funding research into type 1 diabetes, Ford will be launching a poster marketing campaign featuring a series of young kids from all over Britain who are living with the condition. You can read more about the campaign here.

We are excited about our partnership with Ford and want to thank them for choosing to support us as part of their centennial year celebrations. We look forward to updating you on how the partnership progresses and hope that fundraising speeds ahead in the year to come!

06
Jul

Doctors get in goal for World Medical Football Championships

The 17th World Medical Football Championships will take place on 23-30 July 2011 at the Midlands Hotel in Manchester. The event gives doctors from all over the world a chance to compete against each other in a football tournament whilst also attending the international World Medical Health Conference on Health and Medicine in Sport.

Over 400 medics will compete on the pitch to win the Ferran Morell trophy and be crowned as champions.

Since the event began, the competition has been hosted in Germany, Australia, Lithuania, South Korea and Austria. This year the tournament will be hosted by the British Medical Team in Manchester.

The WMFC has kindly chosen JDRF to benefit from all monies raised as part of the football tournament and other related activities this year. They are hoping to raise at least £2,000 to go towards research into type 1 diabetes.

For more information regarding this year's competition you can visit the World Medical Football Federation website