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Improved access to insulin pumps in Scotland

27 February 2012

JDRF welcomes the news that all eligible under eighteens with type 1 diabetes in Scotland will now have access to insulin pumps. The Scottish Government has said it is committing funding of at least £1 million to help NHS Boards deliver pumps to under eighteens who need them, as well as tripling the amount of pumps available to all people with the condition in Scotland.

Health Secretary Nicola Sturgeon made the announcement saying, ‘Insulin pumps mean freedom from having multiple insulin jabs a day - giving Scotland's youngest diabetics a normal childhood. By the end of March 2013, this treatment will be made available to the 480 children and teens struggling with type 1 diabetes who could benefit from it. Over the next three years, NHS Boards will also increase the number of insulin pumps available to all Scots to 2,000, tripling the current amount.

‘Diabetes is a growing problem for Scotland - around 10 per cent per cent of overall hospital expenditure relates to diabetes treatment and complications. Not dealing effectively with diabetes can cause long term health problems and we need to make sure that the youngest people with type 1 diabetes get the best possible treatment as early as possible.’

Karen Addington, Chief Executive of JDRF said: ‘This is good news for young people with type 1 in Scotland. Insulin pump therapy can help people manage their condition more effectively and reduce the risk of the devastating long term complications of type 1.

JDRF is focused on improving lives, until we find the cure, and we have been campaigning for some time for improved access to pumps. We are delighted that Scotland is taking the lead in providing excellent treatment for people with type 1 and we hope to see similar improvements across the rest of the UK in the future.’

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